Friday, October 6, 2017

Top Labor Law Stories from US in September

  1. SCOTUS Appears Ready To Deal Devastating Blow To Public Unions
  2. What Does DACA Rescission Mean For Employers?
  3. President Trump Revises Travel Ban A Third Time
  4. Hurricane Irma Slams Florida, Leaving Employers With Many Questions In Its Wake
  5. Workers File Equal Pay Class Action Lawsuit Against Google
  6. Trial Against Gig Economy Classification System Wraps Up
  7. Fisher Phillips Offers Comments To Labor Department On Exemption Rules
  8. Judge OK’s $8.75 Million Postmates Misclassification Settlement
  9. Education Secretary Rescinds Obama-Era Campus Sexual Assault Guidance
  10. USDOL Drops Appeal In Overtime Rule Case
From https://www.lexology.com/library/detail.aspx?g=9797e4b1-487c-43bb-8a05-c58c44211e67

Monday, October 2, 2017

SCOTUS Revisiting Public Unions

SCOTUS is set to take on the the labor unions,
In a move that must have labor unions across the country trembling with fear, the Supreme Court announced that it will once again take up the issue of whether public sector agency shop fee arrangements are prohibited by the First Amendment. If the Court rules as expected and strikes down these common arrangements, it would be a big blow to the influence that labor has across the country (Janus v. American Federation of State, County, and Municipal Employees, Council 31).
More here/: https://www.fisherphillips.com/resources-alerts-scotus-deal-devastating-blow-to-public-unions

Monday, September 19, 2016

Brexit, the EU, and employment laws

How will Brexit impact employment law in the UK? There are far more unanswered questions than answers, and the tangled mess doesn't appear to have either easy or quick solutions. In the UK Brexit isn't the only issue, right now employers are navigating other legislation changes including: living wage, apprenticeship levy, and holiday pay.



Will Brexit untangle UK employment law from Europe?

What does leaving Europe mean for employment laws?

Tuesday, May 3, 2016

San Francisco Becomes First City to Require Paid Parental Leave

America is not known for being a leader in employment rights. At the risk of sounding socialist, some of the rights afforded to employees in other countries are virtually nonexistent in the US. For example parental leave is something virtually unheard of in United States. If you want to have a kid you better plan to set money aside or have a very generous employer.

On April 5th, this City of San Francisco passed legislation requiring certain employers to provide their employees with paid parental leave. The rules come into effect next year and require up to six weeks fully paid parental leave.

New York City is approving similar measures as well.

Tuesday, March 29, 2016

8 Points for New UK Employment Law Shifts

Beginning next month, there are a number of employment legislation changes coming into effect. For details read:
http://www.personneltoday.com/hr/employment-law-changes-april-2016/

Tuesday, February 2, 2016

USDOL 2016 Updates/Changes

USDOL prepped for 2016 and will be rolling out some changes including:

Changes to Federal Overtime Exemptions

The USDOL intends to modify wage and hour regulations under the federal Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). The amendments will double the salary ($23,660 to $50,000 per year) for certain “exemptions” from federal overtime requirements.

Secondly, USDOL intends to clamp down on misclassification of employees as independent contractors.

Monday, January 25, 2016

TOp 5 2016 January Employment Law topics USA

Check it out here:

http://www.lexology.com/library/detail.aspx?g=d023c629-b281-422d-bcf8-ca91470214a7